Seminars Archive

Fall 2018

How does the Plasma Membrane Participate in Receptor-Mediated Cell Signaling?

How does the Plasma Membrane Participate in Receptor-Mediated Cell Signaling?

Professor Barbara Baird | Cornell University

Professor Andreas Gahlmann

Cells are poised to respond to their physical environment and to chemical stimuli in terms of collective molecular interactions that are regulated in time and space by the plasma membrane and its connections with the cytoskeleton and intracellular structures. Small molecules may engage specific receptors to initiate a transmembrane signal, and the surrounding system efficiently rearranges to amplify this nanoscale interaction to microscale assemblies, yielding a cellular response that often reaches to longer length scales within the organism. A striking example of signal integration over multiple length scales is the allergic immune response. IgE receptors (FceRI) on mast cells are the gatekeepers of this response, and this system has proven to be a valuable model for investigating receptor-mediated cellular activation. My talk will describe our efforts with quantitative fluorescence microscopy and modeling to investigate the poised, “resting state” of the plasma membrane and how signaling, initiated by an external stimulus and mediated by specific receptors, is regulated and targeted within this milieu.

Professor Barbara Baird | Cornell University
Hosted by Professor Andreas Gahlmann
Friday, November 16, 2018

Highly Sterically-Crowded Subvalent Group 14 Compounds: Unexpected Structures and High Reactivity with Small Molecules

Highly Sterically-Crowded Subvalent Group 14 Compounds: Unexpected Structures and High Reactivity with Small Molecules

Professor Philip Power | University of California at Davis

Professor Robert Gilliard

A series of new compounds, MAr2 (M = Ge, Sn, or Pb; Ar = terphenyl ligands) display structures and structural trends that are counter-intuitive with regard to steric effects. These trends are also reflected in their spectroscopic properties and in their reaction chemistry. It was found that the presence or absence of substituents at apparently-remote sites on the ligands can exert a large influence on the course of the reactions, as well as on the structural characteristics of the group 14 element environment. Their reactions with a range of olefins and carbon monoxide, which showed unexpected trends, will be shown. In addition, the reactions of the related subvalent hydrides, ArMH, with a range of olefins and alkyne molecules, as well as the unexpected compounds that are formed, will be presented. A notable feature of their behavior is their ability to induce unexpected isomerizations in the olefin substrates. Finally, it is proposed that many of the peculiar properties of the compounds is related to the presence of dispersion force interactions of their ligand substituents.

Professor Philip Power | University of California at Davis
Hosted by Professor Robert Gilliard
Friday, November 9, 2018

Chemistry and Biology of Nucleic Acid- and Nucleotide-Binding Proteins

Chemistry and Biology of Nucleic Acid- and Nucleotide-Binding Proteins

Professor Yinsheng Wang | University of California Riverside

Professor Huiwang Ai

The functions of nucleotides and nucleic acids involve their interactions with cellular proteins.  In this presentation, I will discuss about our recent efforts toward the development and applications of quantitative proteomic methods for unbiased, proteome-wide discovery of proteins that can recognize unique secondary structures of DNA. I will also discuss our recent development of targeted quantitative proteomic methods for interrogating ATP- and GTP-binding proteins at the entire proteome scale. The application of these methods for uncovering novel targets of clinically used kinase inhibitors and for revealing novel drivers and suppressors for melanoma metastasis will also be presented. Through this presentation, I hope to illustrate that quantitative proteomics constitutes a power tool for discovering novel nucleic acid- and nucleotide-binding proteins and for revealing their functions in cells.

Professor Yinsheng Wang | University of California Riverside
Hosted by Professor Huiwang Ai
Thursday, November 8, 2018

New Chemical Probe Technologies: Applications to Imaging, Target Identification and Drug Discovery

New Chemical Probe Technologies: Applications to Imaging, Target Identification and Drug Discovery

Professor Matthew Bogyo | Stanford University

Professor Ken Hsu

Hydrolases are enzymes that often play important roles in many common human diseases such as cancer, asthma, arthritis, atherosclerosis and infection by pathogens. Therefore tools that can be used to dynamically monitor their activity can be used as diagnostic agents, as imaging contrast agents and for the identification of novel classes of drugs. In the first part of this presentation, I will describe our efforts to design and synthesize small molecule probes that produce a fluorescent signal upon binding to tumor associated protease targets. We have identified probes that show tumor-specific retention, fast activation kinetics, and rapid systemic distribution making them useful for real-time fluorescence guided tumor resection and other diagnostic imaging applications. In the second half of the talk, I will present our recent advances using chemical probes to identify novel protease and hydrolase targets in pathogenic bacteria. This work has led to new imaging agents for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the identification of novel virulence factors in Staphylococcus aureus that have the potential to be targeted with small molecules as a therapeutic strategy.

Professor Matthew Bogyo | Stanford University
Hosted by Professor Ken Hsu
Friday, November 2, 2018

Instrumented Tissue-in-a-Chip: A Bridge from In Vitro to In Vivo

Instrumented Tissue-in-a-Chip: A Bridge from In Vitro to In Vivo

Professor Chuck Henry | Colorado State University

Professor Rebecca Pompano

Abstract:

Microfluidic methods provide a promising path to mimicking human organ function with applications ranging from fundamental biology to drug metabolism and toxicity. The vast majority of these systems use dissociated, immortalized, or stem cells to create two and three-dimensional models in vitro. While these systems can provide valuable information, they are fundamentally incapable of recreating the three-dimensional complexity of real tissue. As a result, an important gap exists between in vitro models and in vivo systems. To address this gap, we have begun combining microfluidic devices with ex vivo tissue slices or explants to recreate model systems that capture the cellular diversity of real tissue and bridge the gap between in vitro models and in vivo systems. In this presentation two systems will be discussed. The first uses a high-density electrode array equipped with microfluidic flow to image chemical release profiles from living adrenal slices. The second uses a 3D printed microfluidic device with removable inserts to hold and perfuse fluids over intestinal tissue, enabling generation of differential chemical conditions on either side of this important barrier tissue.

Charles Henry, Stuart Tobet, David Dandy, Tom Chen

Colorado State University

Professor Chuck Henry | Colorado State University
Hosted by Professor Rebecca Pompano
Friday, October 26, 2018

Ireland Lecture: Catalyst-Controlled Site-Selective and Enantioselective C–H Functionalization

Ireland Lecture: Catalyst-Controlled Site-Selective and Enantioselective C–H Functionalization

Professor Huw Davies | Emory University

Professor Mike Hilinski
Professor Huw Davies | Emory University
Hosted by Professor Mike Hilinski
Friday, October 19, 2018

Jefferson Lecture: New Photoredox Reactions

Jefferson Lecture: New Photoredox Reactions

Professor David MacMillan | Princeton University

Graduate Student Council

Abstract

This lecture will discuss the advent and development of new concepts in chemical synthesis, specifically the application of visible light photoredox catalysis to the discovery or invention of new chemical transformations.  This lecture will explore a strategy the discovery of chemical reactions using photoredox catalysis.  Moreover, we will further describe how mechanistic understanding of these discovered processes has led to the design of new yet fundamental chemical transformations that we hope will be broadly adopted.  In particular, a new catalysis activation mode that allows for the development of C–H abstraction and decarboxylative coupling reactions that interface with organometallic catalysis.

Professor David MacMillan | Princeton University
Hosted by Graduate Student Council
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Spontaneous Formation of Oligomers and Fibrils in Large Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Alzheimer’s Peptides

Spontaneous Formation of Oligomers and Fibrils in Large Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Alzheimer’s Peptides

Professor Carol Hall  | North Carolina State University

Professor Kateri DuBay

Spontaneous Formation of Oligomers and Fibrils in Large-Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Alzheimer’s Peptides

Protein aggregation is associated with serious and eventually-fatal neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and the prion diseases.  While atomic resolution molecular dynamics simulations have been useful in this regard, they are limited to an examination of either oligomer formation by a small number of peptides or analysis of the stability of a moderate number of peptides placed in trial or known experimental structures. We describe large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of the spontaneous formation of fibrils by systems containing large numbers of peptides. The simulations are fast enough to enable us to follow the steps in the aggregation process from an initial configuration of random coils to oligomers and then to proto-filaments with cross-β structures. In simulations of Aβ17-42 peptides, we uncovered two fibrillization mechanisms that govern their structural conversion from disordered oligomers into protofilaments.  We also investigate the influence of crowding agents on oligomerization and fibrillization for Aβ16-22. Simulations are conducted which allow examination of the impact of naturally-derived inhibitors (resveratrol, curcumin, vanillin, and curcumin) on the oligomerization and fibrillation of A β17-36. Finally, we describe simulations of human, mouse and Syrian Movies of the aggregation process on a molecular level will be shown.

Professor Carol Hall  | North Carolina State University
Hosted by Professor Kateri DuBay
Friday, October 12, 2018

Incorporating Functional Nanomaterials in Layer-by-Layer Amperometric Sensor Designs: Adaptable Templates for Clinically Relevant Measurements

Incorporating Functional Nanomaterials in Layer-by-Layer Amperometric Sensor Designs: Adaptable Templates for Clinically Relevant Measurements

Professor Michael Leopold | University of Richmond

Professor Rebecca Pompano

Abstract

Research and development of materials and strategies for real-time, amperometric sensors and biosensors with potential in-vitro or in-vivo applications for clinically relevant physiological agents continues to be a relevant scientific endeavor.  Within this field of study, a large number of reports continue to focus on enzyme-based glucose detection because it serves both as a well-understood fundamental model system and as a clinically relevant sensing goal for diabetics.  It is, however, relatively rare that the same strategies and materials utilized for glucose sensing prove to be robust and versatile enough to be readily adapted to different target molecules with clinical relevance.  It follows then that a significant achievement would be the demonstration of a strategy and the use of materials that offer this type of versatility while maintaining superior performance toward a molecule with bioanalytical implications and possible medical applications.  Our work explores layer-by-layer (LbL) strategies for amperometric biosensor and sensor designs, where each layer or material within the composite film, including the incorporation of different nanomaterials, is functional with respect to sensing sensitivity and/or selectivity.  Additionally, this research also involves sensor development toward practical and effective clinical usage where the LbL strategies must be successfully adapted and miniaturized to needle or wire electrodes that can potentially function in vitro as a bedside device, within catheters for continuous, real-time measurements, or as an in vivo implant operating in biological media and physiologically relevant concentrations.     Fundamental studies proceed with a glucose model system before adapting the strategy and materials to specifically targeted clinical measurements including early detection/monitoring for sepsis, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and prostate cancer among others.   

Professor Michael Leopold | University of Richmond
Hosted by Professor Rebecca Pompano
Friday, September 28, 2018

Indole Alkaloids and Phenazine Antibiotics: New Platforms for Discovery

Indole Alkaloids and Phenazine Antibiotics: New Platforms for Discovery

Professor Robert Huigens | University of Florida

Professor Mike Hilinski

Abstract:

Various natural products, such as taxol, morphine and vancomycin, play a prominent role in medicine due to their ability to modulate biological targets critical to human disease. Our lab has two natural product inspired synthetic medicinal chemistry programs, driven by the structural complexity of indole alkaloids and the biological function of phenazine antibiotics. Each program aims to address major biomedical problems, including: (1) enhancing the chemical diversity of screening libraries used to drive drug discovery in high throughput screening campaigns and (2) the discovery of small molecules capable of targeting and eradicating surface-attached bacterial biofilms. Our first program aims to rapidly generate diverse and complex compounds, which can be accessed through short synthetic sequences motivated by the dramatic alteration of the inherent complex ring system of indole alkaloids. From these efforts, we have generated a library of >200 complex and diverse small molecules, which are producing an array of interesting hit compounds in diverse disease areas. Our second program aims to target bacterial biofilms, which contain specialized persister cells that are metabolically dormant and demonstrate tolerance towards every class of conventional antibiotic currently available. Biofilms are the underlying cause of chronic and recurring bacterial infections. Our lab has discovered that the marine phenazine antibiotic 2-bromo-1-hydroxyphenazine is a tunable molecular scaffold that provides access to highly potent antibacterial agents that are able to eradicate drug-resistant and antibiotic-tolerant bacterial biofilms. 

Professor Robert Huigens | University of Florida
Hosted by Professor Mike Hilinski
Friday, September 21, 2018

Graham Lecture: Increasing Access to Global Healthcare: The Medicines for All Institute

Graham Lecture: Increasing Access to Global Healthcare: The Medicines for All Institute

Professor Frank Gupton - NOTE: Lecture is on Thursday at 7:00 PM | Virginia Commonwealth University

Professor Brooks Pate

Abstract:   Access to global public healthcare is impacted by many technical, economic, and social factors. It is widely recognized that the resources required to deliver and improve global public health are currently constrained.  A powerful way to increase access is to lower the cost of products and services that have already proven to be effective.  Currently, the cost of producing a wide range of pharmaceutical products is higher than it needs to be. The mission of Medicines for All (M4All) is to transform active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) processes in order to reduce medication cost and improve patient access.  To fulfill this objective, M4ALL has developed a set of core principles for API process development, which is derived from fundamental elements of process intensification that are commonly known but often neglected. These principles have been applied to several global health drugs yielding dramatic improvements in chemical efficiency. The development of novel heterogeneous cross-coupling that support this effort will also be presented.

Professor Frank Gupton - NOTE: Lecture is on Thursday at 7:00 PM | Virginia Commonwealth University
Hosted by Professor Brooks Pate
Thursday, September 13, 2018

Reductive Carboxylation of Unsaturated Hydrocarbons with CO2

Reductive Carboxylation of Unsaturated Hydrocarbons with CO2

Professor Brian Popp | West Virginia University

Professor Mike Hilinski

ABSTRACT

Carbon dioxide is an attractive C1 synthon in chemical synthesis due to its abundance, obtainability, non-toxicity, and inherent renewability. However, it has been undervalued and underutilized for the synthetic installation of carboxyl functionality because of its unreactive nature, owing to its inherent thermodynamic stability and kinetic inertness. Traditionally the carboxyl group is accessed by organic chemists through redox manipulation and protection/deprotection reactions or through the use of strong nucleophiles that have limited functional group tolerance. By fixing carbon dioxide with unsaturated organic molecules through C–C bond formation, rapid and redox-economic synthesis of carboxylic acids and their derivatives can be realized. Nevertheless, these transformations remain rare, are poorly understood, and generally limited to more energetic alkyne substrates. The Popp Research Group uses methodological and mechanistic approaches to expand the versatility and usefulness of transition metal-catalyzed reductive olefin carboxylation. Two approaches that will be discussed in this seminar are transfer hydrometallation–carboxylation and hetero(element)carboxylation. Recent mechanistic work will be presented on an iron-catalyzed variant of the former reaction class that has revealed new details, and possibly new opportunities, for this poorly understood class of reaction. The latter manifold was only recently extended by our group to include olefins (vinyl arenes) for the first time (ACS Editors’ Choice–Org. Lett. 2016, 18, 6428). The mild method uses redox-neutral copper catalysis and a single atmosphere of CO2 to obtain boron-functionalized α-aryl carboxylic acids, including novel functionalized-NSAIDs such as bora-ibuprofen and bora-naproxen. Recent progress toward the preparation of new bora-olefin compounds, subsequent synthetic elaboration of the carbon-boron bond, and complementary experimental/computational studies to improve our mechanistic understanding of the reaction will also be presented.

Professor Brian Popp | West Virginia University
Hosted by Professor Mike Hilinski
Friday, September 7, 2018

2018

2018-19 Kick-off Seminar: A Taste of Space: New Recipes for Making Complex Interstellar Molecules

2018-19 Kick-off Seminar: A Taste of Space: New Recipes for Making Complex Interstellar Molecules

Professor Robin Garrod | UVA Department of Chemistry

Professor Eric Herbst

ABSTRACT

Interstellar space is replete with molecules, ranging from the very simple (e.g. molecular hydrogen), to more complex and exotic species such as the cyanopolyynes (e.g. HC9N). However, young star-forming regions in particular demonstrate the richest chemistry observed outside the solar system, and are host to many molecules that are familiar from the terrestrial chemistry lab, including alcohols, aldehydes, esters and ethers; it is still a matter of debate how much of this interstellar material can survive intact to the planet-formation stage and beyond. Recent millimeter-wavelength spectral observations of high-mass star-forming regions, using the new ALMA telescope, have identified a range of new, and yet more complex molecules, whose formation mechanisms are just beginning to be fully explored. Diffusive chemistry on cold dust-grain surfaces and the energetic processing of the resultant ice mantles seem to play a critical role for many.

I will outline the chemical and physical processes that take place in interstellar clouds and star-forming cores, and will discuss new astronomical observations of organic molecules. I will also show how new chemical kinetics simulations, combined with astrophysical spectral-emission models, can help us understand both the chemistry of star formation, and the laboratory experiments that aim to reproduce its conditions.

Professor Robin Garrod | UVA Department of Chemistry
Hosted by Professor Eric Herbst
Friday, August 31, 2018

Spring 2018

Phosphorus-Element Bond-Forming Reactions

Phosphorus-Element Bond-Forming Reactions

Professor Christopher Cummins | Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Professor Robert Gilliard

White phosphorus (P4) has been the traditional entry point into phosphorus chemistry. The thirteenth element to have been isolated, it can be oxidized with elemental oxygen or chlorine, or reduced in a variety of ways. We investigated its reduction using early transition metal systems and breakdown to produce complexes with terminal metal-phosphorus triple bonds. Such terminal phosphide complexes possess nucleophilic phosphorus atoms, paving the way to new phosphorus-element bonded systems. This opened the door to the study of reactive diphosphorus molecules, the naked P2 molecule being otherwise a high-temperature species. Subsequently, it proved possible to deliver P2 into organic molecules using photochemical “cracking” of white phosphorus, the P2 serving as an effective dienophile with 1,3-dienes. An alternative pathway to the generation of unsaturated, P-containing reactive intermediates is through the use of anthracene as a delivery platform as illustrated for aminophosphinidenes, the interstellar molecule HCP, and diphosphorus. The raw material serving as a phosphorus source for global agriculture is not white phosphorus, but rather apatite in phosphate rock. White phosphorus is made in the legacy “thermal process”, accounting for ca. 5% of global phosphate rock consumption but ca. 30% of the energy utilized in phosphate rock upgrading. Now we are seeking routes to value-added phosphorus chemicals that leverage the “wet process”, in which phosphate rock is treated with sulfuric acid en route to phosphoric acid and phosphate fertilizers. 

Professor Christopher Cummins | Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Hosted by Professor Robert Gilliard
Friday, April 27, 2018

Supramolecular Approaches to Advanced Functional Materials

Supramolecular Approaches to Advanced Functional Materials

Professor Davita Watkins | University of Mississippi

Professors Robert Gilliard & Jill Venton
Professor Davita Watkins | University of Mississippi
Hosted by Professors Robert Gilliard & Jill Venton
Friday, April 20, 2018

ACS Poster Session & Meeting

ACS Poster Session & Meeting

Friday, April 13, 2018

Hecht Lecture - Life 2.0: Synthetic Self-Replicating and Evolving SystemsLife 2.0: Synthetic Self-Replicating and Evolving Systems

Hecht Lecture - Life 2.0: Synthetic Self-Replicating and Evolving SystemsLife 2.0: Synthetic Self-Replicating and Evolving Systems

Professor Gerald F. Joyce | Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Professor Sid Hecht | Reception follows - Chemistry Lobby
Professor Gerald F. Joyce | Salk Institute for Biological Studies
Hosted by Professor Sid Hecht | Reception follows - Chemistry Lobby
Friday, April 6, 2018

Photoredox and Electrochemical Methods for C-N Bond Forming Reactions

Photoredox and Electrochemical Methods for C-N Bond Forming Reactions

Professor Aaron Vannucci | University of South Carolina

Professor Charlie Machan

Photoredox and Electrochemical Methods for C-N Bond Forming Reactions

C-N bonds are ubiquitous in medical, pharmaceutical, and natural products. Therefore, it is important to develop synthetic procedures that both effectively form C-N bonds and incorporate sustainable principles. These principles include the use of renewable energies sources such as sunlight, utilization of abundant transition metal catalysts, and increasing the atom economy of the reactions. Along these lines, we have utilized dual photoredox system capable of accessing diaryl amines, amines containing aliphatic groups, and tertiary amines nickel catalysis to perform aryl-amine cross-coupling reactions. Until very recently this class of C-N bond forming reactions were limited to Pd-catalyzed reactions. Our system is the first Ni-catalyzed reaction system capable of synthesizing diaryl amines, tertiary amines, and amines containing aliphatic groups. Mechanistic studies support an amine-radical-based reaction pathway that allows for the access to the range of products. Furthermore, we have developed an “anion pool” electrochemical method for the synthesis of N-substituted heterocycles. This base-free and transition-metal-free approach exhibits good atom economy and has proven widely applicable for the synthesis of substituted benzimidazoles.

Professor Aaron Vannucci | University of South Carolina
Hosted by Professor Charlie Machan
Friday, March 30, 2018

Profiling Cellular-to-Molecular Diversity Using Electrophoretic Cytometry

Profiling Cellular-to-Molecular Diversity Using Electrophoretic Cytometry

Professor Amy Herr | University of California at Berkeley

Professor James Landers
Professor Amy Herr | University of California at Berkeley
Hosted by Professor James Landers
Friday, March 23, 2018

It’s Complex: Probing Protein Interactions from Single-Molecule to Cellular Scales

It’s Complex: Probing Protein Interactions from Single-Molecule to Cellular Scales

Julea Vlassakis | Fellow, Herr Lab| University of California, Berkeley

Professor James Landers

Abstract

Biological molecules rarely act alone. Instead, molecular complexes carry out a range of cellular functions from DNA repair to cell motility and protein folding. Dysfunction of complexes is implicated in numerous diseases. For example, altered cellular distributions of actin cytoskeletal protein monomers and complexes result in highly motile and invasive cancer cells. Such dysfunction arises biochemically, biophysically, or both. Biochemical and biophysical changes occur on the length and force scales of the complexes themselves—micro/nanoscale and ultra-low forces. Microscale tools, such as size-based electrophoretic (EP) cytometry protein separations, and piconewton-scale magnetic tweezers, can measure such small size and force changes respectively.

I will describe efforts to establish and apply microscale tools to study the function of diverse protein complexes. First, I will discuss the design of single-cell EP cytometry fractionation of actin complexes from monomers. The microscale device geometry achieves rapid, arrayed on-chip sample preparation and EP fractionation without perturbing complexes. Second, I will share how magnetic tweezers reveal that tension in Rad51-DNA protein complexes drives accurate DNA damage repair processes. Finally, we will explore the future of microscale biophysical and biochemical analysis of complexes, with a focus on chaperone protein complexes responsible for protein folding, which goes awry in Alzheimer’s disease. 

Julea Vlassakis | Fellow, Herr Lab| University of California, Berkeley
Hosted by Professor James Landers
Thursday, March 22, 2018

Graduate Recruiting

Graduate Recruiting

Friday, March 16, 2018

Spring Break Ends

Spring Break Ends

Friday, March 9, 2018

Spring Break Begins

Spring Break Begins

Friday, March 2, 2018

Folding- and dynamics-based electrochemical biosensors

Folding- and dynamics-based electrochemical biosensors

Professor Rebecca Lai | University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Professor Jill Venton

This seminar will cover the recent advances in the design and fabrication of folding- and dynamics-based electrochemical biosensors. These devices, which are often termed electrochemical DNA (E-DNA), aptamer-based (E-AB), and peptide-based (E-PB) sensors, are fabricated via direct immobilization of a thiolated and methylene blue (MB)-modified oligonucleotide or peptide probe onto a gold electrode. Binding of an analyte to the probe changes its structure and/or flexibility, which, in turn, influences the electron transfer between the MB label and the interrogating electrode. These sensors are resistant to false positive signals arising from the non-specific adsorption of contaminants and perform well even when employed directly in whole blood, saliva, and other realistically complex sample matrices. Furthermore, because all of the sensing components are chemisorbed onto the electrode surface, they are readily regenerable and reusable. Our results show that many of these sensors have achieved state-of-the-art sensitivity while offering the unprecedented selectivity, reusability and operational convenience of direct electrochemical detection.

 

Professor Rebecca Lai | University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Hosted by Professor Jill Venton
Friday, February 23, 2018

Antibody affinity reagents and reproducibility: Strategies and challenges for the renewable diagnostics and therapeutics antibodies

Antibody affinity reagents and reproducibility: Strategies and challenges for the renewable diagnostics and therapeutics antibodies

Professor Bhupal Ban | UVA - Antibody Engineering & Technology Core

Professor Rebecca Pompano - *NOTE: (Dell 2 Room 100)

Learning Objectives

  •       Trends for isolation of monoclonal antibodies
  •       Current  antibody reproducibility problem in academic institute
  •       Antibody validation: Standards, policies, and practices 
  •       A new mindset for affinity application, evaluation, and authorization
  •       The advantages of recombinant antibody production methods over monoclonal and polyclonal antibody production methods.
  •       Phage display antibody production be adapted to produce the characteristic desired in applications such as multiple epitope recognition, tissues, and phenotype functional antibodies. 
  •       Learn about protein chemistry and conjugation of antibody and drug
  •       Immobilize antibody onto different polymers, nanoparticles, liposome  
Professor Bhupal Ban | UVA - Antibody Engineering & Technology Core
Hosted by Professor Rebecca Pompano - *NOTE: (Dell 2 Room 100)
Wednesday, February 21, 2018

In silico searches for (in)efficient electrocatalysts through chemical and material compound space

In silico searches for (in)efficient electrocatalysts through chemical and material compound space

Professor John Keith | University of Pittsburgh

Professor Charlie Machan

This talk will provide an overview of our group’s work using both standard and atypical high-performance computational chemistry modeling to elucidate atomic scale reaction mechanisms of catalytic reactions. I will introduce our toolkit of in silico methods for accurately modeling (electro)catalytic reactions in solvating environments. I will then present how in silico methods can be used for predictive insights into chemical and material design. The talk will then highlight our progress in modeling 1) the complex Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction, 2) inefficient amorphous TiO2 materials as anti-corrosion coatings, and 3) biomimetic CO2 reduction mechanisms.

Professor John Keith | University of Pittsburgh
Hosted by Professor Charlie Machan
Friday, February 16, 2018

Interactions of antimicrobial and cell-penetrating peptides with lipid membranes

Interactions of antimicrobial and cell-penetrating peptides with lipid membranes

Professor Paulo Almeida | University of North Carolina at Wilmington

Professor Dave Cafiso

Antimicrobial, cytolytic, and cell-penetrating peptides, often called membrane-active peptides, belong to a variety of structural classes, including, alpha-helical, beta-sheet, unstructured, and cyclic polypeptides, among others. Those peptides were intensely studied in the 1990s and early 2000s with the hope of opening the door for urgently needed new antibiotics. For about 15 years we have studied the kinetics and thermodynamics of their interactions with lipid vesicles with the hope of understanding the mechanism of their function. In general, these peptides bind to lipid bilayers and somehow disrupt or perturb them, causing flux of ions and molecules across the membrane, and also, in some cases, translocating themselves across the membrane. In this talk, I will discuss our efforts to understand the mechanisms of these peptides and what we have learned regarding the effect of sequence on their ability to translocate across the membrane. I will conclude with the examination of a very different case, the cyclic peptide daptomycin, which is one of the few in clinical use. This peptide appears to behave very differently from all other membrane-active peptides that we have studied.

Professor Paulo Almeida | University of North Carolina at Wilmington
Hosted by Professor Dave Cafiso
Friday, February 2, 2018

Quantifying biochemistry in living cells

Quantifying biochemistry in living cells

Professor Amy Palmer | University of Colorado at Boulder

Professor Andreas Gahlmann

Increasingly, fluorescent tools are providing insight into the “dark matter” of the cellular milieu: small molecules, secondary metabolites, metals, and ions.  One of the great promises of such tools is the ability to quantify cellular signals in precise locations with high temporal resolution.  Yet this is coupled with the challenge of how to ensure that our tools are not perturbing the underlying biology and the need to systematically measure hundreds of individual cells over time.  The focus of research in the Palmer Lab is to develop fluorescent tools to illuminate and quantify biochemistry in living cells.  In addition to developing such tools, we strive to develop robust systematic analytical approaches for using sensors and fluorescence microscopy to carry out quantitative biochemistry at the single cell level.  Over the past 12 years our greatest effort has been in understanding the cell biology of zinc.  We have developed fluorescent sensors to map out the spatial distribution of zinc ions and quantify zinc dynamics in live mammalian cells.  These tools have allowed us to answer fundamental questions such as: where zinc is located in cells, how much is present in different kinds of cells, under what conditions zinc ions are dynamic, and how the zinc status of healthy cells differs from diseased cells.  Along the way, we have also established benchmark analytical approaches for using fluorescent sensors for quantitative biology and biophysics.  We have developed microfluidic cell sorting technologies to study and engineer fluorescent tools.  We have leveraged our expertise in fluorescent probes, single cell biology and live cell imaging to establish new methods for defining the complex dynamic interface between bacterial pathogens and host mammalian cells. And finally, we have started to expand our reach to develop chemical biology tools for labelling and tracking RNA in live cells.  This talk will provide a highlight of these research areas.

 

.

Professor Amy Palmer | University of Colorado at Boulder
Hosted by Professor Andreas Gahlmann
Friday, January 26, 2018

Transition metal catalyzed hydroarylation of Olefins: New catalysts for alkyl and alkenyl arenes

Transition metal catalyzed hydroarylation of Olefins: New catalysts for alkyl and alkenyl arenes

Professor Brent Gunnoe | University of Virginia

Professor Jill Venton
Professor Brent Gunnoe | University of Virginia
Hosted by Professor Jill Venton
Friday, January 19, 2018

Spring 2019

GRADUATE RECRUITMENT WEEK: NO SEMINAR

GRADUATE RECRUITMENT WEEK: NO SEMINAR

Thursday, March 22, 2018

Pages