UVA Chemistry People Adam Borne

Featured Students

Adam Borne has been awarded the 2018 Wagner Fellowship award. He is one of 14 students receiving the award this year.

UVA Chemistry People

Featured Faculty

Professor Emeritus Lester Andrews has been honored with a Festschrift Virtual Special Issue of the Journal of Physical Chemistry A.

Seminars

Jefferson Lecture: New Photoredox Reactions

Jefferson Lecture: New Photoredox Reactions

Professor David MacMillan | Princeton University

Hosted by Graduate Student Council

Abstract

This lecture will discuss the advent and development of new concepts in chemical synthesis, specifically the application of visible light photoredox catalysis to the discovery or invention of new chemical transformations.  This lecture will explore a strategy the discovery of chemical reactions using photoredox catalysis.  Moreover, we will further describe how mechanistic understanding of these discovered processes has led to the design of new yet fundamental chemical transformations that we hope will be broadly adopted.  In particular, a new catalysis activation mode that allows for the development of C–H abstraction and decarboxylative coupling reactions that interface with organometallic catalysis.

Wednesday, October 17, 2018
Ireland Lecture: Catalyst-Controlled Site-Selective and Enantioselective C–H Functionalization

Ireland Lecture: Catalyst-Controlled Site-Selective and Enantioselective C–H Functionalization

Professor Huw Davies | Emory University

Hosted by Professor Mike Hilinski
Friday, October 19, 2018
Instrumented Tissue-in-a-Chip: A Bridge from In Vitro to In Vivo

Instrumented Tissue-in-a-Chip: A Bridge from In Vitro to In Vivo

Professor Chuck Henry | Colorado State University

Hosted by Professor Rebecca Pompano

Abstract:

Microfluidic methods provide a promising path to mimicking human organ function with applications ranging from fundamental biology to drug metabolism and toxicity. The vast majority of these systems use dissociated, immortalized, or stem cells to create two and three-dimensional models in vitro. While these systems can provide valuable information, they are fundamentally incapable of recreating the three-dimensional complexity of real tissue. As a result, an important gap exists between in vitro models and in vivo systems. To address this gap, we have begun combining microfluidic devices with ex vivo tissue slices or explants to recreate model systems that capture the cellular diversity of real tissue and bridge the gap between in vitro models and in vivo systems. In this presentation two systems will be discussed. The first uses a high-density electrode array equipped with microfluidic flow to image chemical release profiles from living adrenal slices. The second uses a 3D printed microfluidic device with removable inserts to hold and perfuse fluids over intestinal tissue, enabling generation of differential chemical conditions on either side of this important barrier tissue.

Charles Henry, Stuart Tobet, David Dandy, Tom Chen

Colorado State University

Friday, October 26, 2018

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