Seminars

All seminars are held at 3:30 PM in the Mechanical Engineering Building (MEC) Room 205 unless otherwise noted.

Spring 2018

Feb
21

Antibody affinity reagents and reproducibility: Strategies and challenges for the renewable diagnostics and therapeutics antibodies

Antibody affinity reagents and reproducibility: Strategies and challenges for the renewable diagnostics and therapeutics antibodies

Professor Bhupal Ban | UVA - Antibody Engineering & Technology Core

Professor Rebecca Pompano - *NOTE: (Dell 2 Room 100)

Learning Objectives

  •       Trends for isolation of monoclonal antibodies
  •       Current  antibody reproducibility problem in academic institute
  •       Antibody validation: Standards, policies, and practices 
  •       A new mindset for affinity application, evaluation, and authorization
  •       The advantages of recombinant antibody production methods over monoclonal and polyclonal antibody production methods.
  •       Phage display antibody production be adapted to produce the characteristic desired in applications such as multiple epitope recognition, tissues, and phenotype functional antibodies. 
  •       Learn about protein chemistry and conjugation of antibody and drug
  •       Immobilize antibody onto different polymers, nanoparticles, liposome  
Professor Bhupal Ban | UVA - Antibody Engineering & Technology Core
Hosted by Professor Rebecca Pompano - *NOTE: (Dell 2 Room 100)
Feb
23

Folding- and dynamics-based electrochemical biosensors

Folding- and dynamics-based electrochemical biosensors

Professor Rebecca Lai | University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Professor Jill Venton

This seminar will cover the recent advances in the design and fabrication of folding- and dynamics-based electrochemical biosensors. These devices, which are often termed electrochemical DNA (E-DNA), aptamer-based (E-AB), and peptide-based (E-PB) sensors, are fabricated via direct immobilization of a thiolated and methylene blue (MB)-modified oligonucleotide or peptide probe onto a gold electrode. Binding of an analyte to the probe changes its structure and/or flexibility, which, in turn, influences the electron transfer between the MB label and the interrogating electrode. These sensors are resistant to false positive signals arising from the non-specific adsorption of contaminants and perform well even when employed directly in whole blood, saliva, and other realistically complex sample matrices. Furthermore, because all of the sensing components are chemisorbed onto the electrode surface, they are readily regenerable and reusable. Our results show that many of these sensors have achieved state-of-the-art sensitivity while offering the unprecedented selectivity, reusability and operational convenience of direct electrochemical detection.

 

Professor Rebecca Lai | University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Hosted by Professor Jill Venton
Mar
02

Spring Break Begins

Spring Break Begins

Mar
09

Spring Break Ends

Spring Break Ends

Mar
16

Graduate Recruiting

Graduate Recruiting

Mar
23

Profiling cellular-to-molecular diversity using electrophoretic cytometry

Profiling cellular-to-molecular diversity using electrophoretic cytometry

Professor Amy Herr | University of California at Berkeley

Professor James Landers
Professor Amy Herr | University of California at Berkeley
Hosted by Professor James Landers
Mar
30

TBA

TBA

Professor Aaron Vannucci | University of South Carolina

Professor Charlie Machan
Professor Aaron Vannucci | University of South Carolina
Hosted by Professor Charlie Machan
Apr
06

HECHT LECTURE TBA

HECHT LECTURE TBA

Professor Gerald Joyce | Scripps Research Institute

Professor Sid Hecht
Professor Gerald Joyce | Scripps Research Institute
Hosted by Professor Sid Hecht
Apr
13

ACS Poster Session & Meeting

ACS Poster Session & Meeting

Apr
20

Supramolecular Approaches to Advanced Functional Materials

Supramolecular Approaches to Advanced Functional Materials

Professor Davita Watkins | University of Mississippi

Professors Robert Gilliard & Jill Venton
Professor Davita Watkins | University of Mississippi
Hosted by Professors Robert Gilliard & Jill Venton
Apr
27

Phosphorus-Element Bond-Forming Reactions

Phosphorus-Element Bond-Forming Reactions

Professor Christopher Cummins | Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Professor Robert Gilliard

White phosphorus (P4) has been the traditional entry point into phosphorus chemistry. The thirteenth element to have been isolated, it can be oxidized with elemental oxygen or chlorine, or reduced in a variety of ways. We investigated its reduction using early transition metal systems and breakdown to produce complexes with terminal metal-phosphorus triple bonds. Such terminal phosphide complexes possess nucleophilic phosphorus atoms, paving the way to new phosphorus-element bonded systems. This opened the door to the study of reactive diphosphorus molecules, the naked P2 molecule being otherwise a high-temperature species. Subsequently, it proved possible to deliver P2 into organic molecules using photochemical “cracking” of white phosphorus, the P2 serving as an effective dienophile with 1,3-dienes. An alternative pathway to the generation of unsaturated, P-containing reactive intermediates is through the use of anthracene as a delivery platform as illustrated for aminophosphinidenes, the interstellar molecule HCP, and diphosphorus. The raw material serving as a phosphorus source for global agriculture is not white phosphorus, but rather apatite in phosphate rock. White phosphorus is made in the legacy “thermal process”, accounting for ca. 5% of global phosphate rock consumption but ca. 30% of the energy utilized in phosphate rock upgrading. Now we are seeking routes to value-added phosphorus chemicals that leverage the “wet process”, in which phosphate rock is treated with sulfuric acid en route to phosphoric acid and phosphate fertilizers. 

Professor Christopher Cummins | Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Hosted by Professor Robert Gilliard

Fall 2018

Sep
07

TBA

TBA

Sep
14

TBA

TBA

Sep
28

TBA

TBA

Oct
04

Graham Lecture (title TBA)

Graham Lecture (title TBA)

Professor Frank Gupton | Virginia Commonwealth University

Professor Brooks Pate
Professor Frank Gupton | Virginia Commonwealth University
Hosted by Professor Brooks Pate
Oct
12

TBA

TBA

Professor Carol Hall  | North Carolina State University

Professor Kateri DuBay
Professor Carol Hall  | North Carolina State University
Hosted by Professor Kateri DuBay
Oct
12

TBA

TBA

Oct
19

TBA

TBA

Oct
26

TBA - Jefferson Lecture

TBA - Jefferson Lecture

Professor David MacMillan | Princeton University

Professor Robert Dyer
Professor David MacMillan | Princeton University
Hosted by Professor Robert Dyer
Nov
02

TBA

TBA

Nov
09

TBA

TBA

Professor Philip Power | University of California at Davis

Professor Robert Gilliard
Professor Philip Power | University of California at Davis
Hosted by Professor Robert Gilliard
Nov
16

TBA

TBA

2018

Sep
21

TBA

TBA

Professor Lucy Ziurys | University of Arizona

Professor Rob Garrod
Professor Lucy Ziurys | University of Arizona
Hosted by Professor Rob Garrod