Upcoming Seminars

All seminars are held at 3:30 PM in the Mechanical Engineering Building (MEC) Room 205 unless otherwise noted.

Fall 2018

Oct
19

Ireland Lecture: Catalyst-Controlled Site-Selective and Enantioselective C–H Functionalization

Ireland Lecture: Catalyst-Controlled Site-Selective and Enantioselective C–H Functionalization

Professor Huw Davies | Emory University

Professor Mike Hilinski
Professor Huw Davies | Emory University
Hosted by Professor Mike Hilinski
Oct
26

Instrumented Tissue-in-a-Chip: A Bridge from In Vitro to In Vivo

Instrumented Tissue-in-a-Chip: A Bridge from In Vitro to In Vivo

Professor Chuck Henry | Colorado State University

Professor Rebecca Pompano

Abstract:

Microfluidic methods provide a promising path to mimicking human organ function with applications ranging from fundamental biology to drug metabolism and toxicity. The vast majority of these systems use dissociated, immortalized, or stem cells to create two and three-dimensional models in vitro. While these systems can provide valuable information, they are fundamentally incapable of recreating the three-dimensional complexity of real tissue. As a result, an important gap exists between in vitro models and in vivo systems. To address this gap, we have begun combining microfluidic devices with ex vivo tissue slices or explants to recreate model systems that capture the cellular diversity of real tissue and bridge the gap between in vitro models and in vivo systems. In this presentation two systems will be discussed. The first uses a high-density electrode array equipped with microfluidic flow to image chemical release profiles from living adrenal slices. The second uses a 3D printed microfluidic device with removable inserts to hold and perfuse fluids over intestinal tissue, enabling generation of differential chemical conditions on either side of this important barrier tissue.

Charles Henry, Stuart Tobet, David Dandy, Tom Chen

Colorado State University

Professor Chuck Henry | Colorado State University
Hosted by Professor Rebecca Pompano
Nov
02

New Chemical Probe Technologies: Applications to Imaging, Target Identification and Drug Discovery

New Chemical Probe Technologies: Applications to Imaging, Target Identification and Drug Discovery

Professor Matthew Bogyo | Stanford University

Professor Ken Hsu

Hydrolases are enzymes that often play important roles in many common human diseases such as cancer, asthma, arthritis, atherosclerosis and infection by pathogens. Therefore tools that can be used to dynamically monitor their activity can be used as diagnostic agents, as imaging contrast agents and for the identification of novel classes of drugs. In the first part of this presentation, I will describe our efforts to design and synthesize small molecule probes that produce a fluorescent signal upon binding to tumor associated protease targets. We have identified probes that show tumor-specific retention, fast activation kinetics, and rapid systemic distribution making them useful for real-time fluorescence guided tumor resection and other diagnostic imaging applications. In the second half of the talk, I will present our recent advances using chemical probes to identify novel protease and hydrolase targets in pathogenic bacteria. This work has led to new imaging agents for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the identification of novel virulence factors in Staphylococcus aureus that have the potential to be targeted with small molecules as a therapeutic strategy.

Professor Matthew Bogyo | Stanford University
Hosted by Professor Ken Hsu
Nov
08

Chemistry and Biology of Nucleic Acid- and Nucleotide-Binding Proteins

Chemistry and Biology of Nucleic Acid- and Nucleotide-Binding Proteins

Professor Yinsheng Wang | University of California Riverside

Professor Huiwang Ai

The functions of nucleotides and nucleic acids involve their interactions with cellular proteins.  In this presentation, I will discuss about our recent efforts toward the development and applications of quantitative proteomic methods for unbiased, proteome-wide discovery of proteins that can recognize unique secondary structures of DNA. I will also discuss our recent development of targeted quantitative proteomic methods for interrogating ATP- and GTP-binding proteins at the entire proteome scale. The application of these methods for uncovering novel targets of clinically used kinase inhibitors and for revealing novel drivers and suppressors for melanoma metastasis will also be presented. Through this presentation, I hope to illustrate that quantitative proteomics constitutes a power tool for discovering novel nucleic acid- and nucleotide-binding proteins and for revealing their functions in cells.

Professor Yinsheng Wang | University of California Riverside
Hosted by Professor Huiwang Ai
Nov
09

Highly Sterically-Crowded Subvalent Group 14 Compounds: Unexpected Structures and High Reactivity with Small Molecules

Highly Sterically-Crowded Subvalent Group 14 Compounds: Unexpected Structures and High Reactivity with Small Molecules

Professor Philip Power | University of California at Davis

Professor Robert Gilliard

A series of new compounds, MAr2 (M = Ge, Sn, or Pb; Ar = terphenyl ligands) display structures and structural trends that are counter-intuitive with regard to steric effects. These trends are also reflected in their spectroscopic properties and in their reaction chemistry. It was found that the presence or absence of substituents at apparently-remote sites on the ligands can exert a large influence on the course of the reactions, as well as on the structural characteristics of the group 14 element environment. Their reactions with a range of olefins and carbon monoxide, which showed unexpected trends, will be shown. In addition, the reactions of the related subvalent hydrides, ArMH, with a range of olefins and alkyne molecules, as well as the unexpected compounds that are formed, will be presented. A notable feature of their behavior is their ability to induce unexpected isomerizations in the olefin substrates. Finally, it is proposed that many of the peculiar properties of the compounds is related to the presence of dispersion force interactions of their ligand substituents.

Professor Philip Power | University of California at Davis
Hosted by Professor Robert Gilliard
Nov
16

How does the Plasma Membrane Participate in Receptor-Mediated Cell Signaling?

How does the Plasma Membrane Participate in Receptor-Mediated Cell Signaling?

Professor Barbara Baird | Cornell University

Professor Andreas Gahlmann

Cells are poised to respond to their physical environment and to chemical stimuli in terms of collective molecular interactions that are regulated in time and space by the plasma membrane and its connections with the cytoskeleton and intracellular structures. Small molecules may engage specific receptors to initiate a transmembrane signal, and the surrounding system efficiently rearranges to amplify this nanoscale interaction to microscale assemblies, yielding a cellular response that often reaches to longer length scales within the organism. A striking example of signal integration over multiple length scales is the allergic immune response. IgE receptors (FceRI) on mast cells are the gatekeepers of this response, and this system has proven to be a valuable model for investigating receptor-mediated cellular activation. My talk will describe our efforts with quantitative fluorescence microscopy and modeling to investigate the poised, “resting state” of the plasma membrane and how signaling, initiated by an external stimulus and mediated by specific receptors, is regulated and targeted within this milieu.

Professor Barbara Baird | Cornell University
Hosted by Professor Andreas Gahlmann

Spring 2019

Jan
18

TBA

TBA

Professor Robbyn Anand | Iowa State University

Nathan Swami
Professor Robbyn Anand | Iowa State University
Hosted by Nathan Swami
Jan
25

TBA

TBA

Professor Shannon Stahl | University of Wisconsin-Madison

Professor Charlie Machan
Professor Shannon Stahl | University of Wisconsin-Madison
Hosted by Professor Charlie Machan
Feb
01

Screening, Isolation, and Characterization of Antibiotic Natural Products

Screening, Isolation, and Characterization of Antibiotic Natural Products

Professor Amanda Wolfe | University of North Carolina Asheville

Professor Mike Hilinski

Abstract

The increased emergence of bacterial resistance over the past two decades has greatly reduced the effectiveness of nearly all clinical antibiotics, bringing infectious disease to the forefront as a dire threat to global health. To combat these infections, new antibiotics need to be rapidly discovered, and bacterial natural products have reemerged as an abundant source of novel bioactive molecules. Herein, the isolation and evaluation of over 400 bacteria from bulk and rhizosphere soil native to western North Carolina and the southwestern U.S. in a novel and robust liquid-based high-throughput antagonism assay against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli is presented. Over 300 bacterial species were screened in monoculture, and 12% and 15% were found to produce antibiotics capable of ≥30% growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli respectively. 69 of those bacteria were subjected to 16s rRNA sequencing and found to be majority Pseudomonas (30%) and Serratia (17%) bacteria, and Aquitalea, Brevundimonas, Chryseobacterium, Herbaspirillum, and Microbacterium bacteria, which are currently not known to be antibiotic producers. More than 10 producing bacteria have been subjected to large scale culture and extraction techniques to isolate the produced antibiotic. One of those, a Pseudomonas sp., was found to produce the natural product pseudopyronine B, and we have further improved the antibiotic activity of this natural product through SAR evaluation of the alkyl side chains.

Professor Amanda Wolfe | University of North Carolina Asheville
Hosted by Professor Mike Hilinski
Feb
15

TBA

TBA

Dr. Rick Olson | Bristol-Myers Squibb

Professor Ken Hsu
Dr. Rick Olson | Bristol-Myers Squibb
Hosted by Professor Ken Hsu
Feb
22

TBD

TBD

Professor Matt Lockett | UNC Chapel Hill

Professor Rebecca Pompano
Professor Matt Lockett | UNC Chapel Hill
Hosted by Professor Rebecca Pompano
Mar
29

Hecht Lecture - TBA

Hecht Lecture - TBA

Professor Dale Boger | Scripps Research Institute; San Diego, CA

Professor Sid Hecht
Professor Dale Boger | Scripps Research Institute; San Diego, CA
Hosted by Professor Sid Hecht
Apr
05

TBD

TBD

Dr. Glen Alliger | ExxonMobil

Professor Charlie Machan
Dr. Glen Alliger | ExxonMobil
Hosted by Professor Charlie Machan
Apr
12

ACS Poster Session

ACS Poster Session

Apr
19

TBA

TBA

Professor Héctor D. Abruña | Cornell University

Professor Sen Zhang
Professor Héctor D. Abruña | Cornell University
Hosted by Professor Sen Zhang
Apr
26

TBA

TBA

Professor Jill Millstone | University of Pittsburgh

Professor Charlie Machan
Professor Jill Millstone | University of Pittsburgh
Hosted by Professor Charlie Machan