Faculty

Serbulea

Professor Serbulea is teaching organic chemistry courses, including the accelerated organic chemistry lectures and laboratories. She is actively involved in the development of the organic chemistry curriculum, focusing on improving the coordination between the topics in the lecture course and the experiments that are carried out in the laboratory. In the accelerated organic chemistry laboratories, students gain hands-on experience in the synthesis, purification, and characterization of organic compounds using modern analytical instruments and laboratory equipment.

Pu

Organic, Polymer and Organometallic Chemistry; Asymmetric Catalysis; Chiral Sensors; Optically Active Materials

Pompano

Our lab develops methods based on microfluidic culture systems, bioanalytical techniques, and spatially resolved simulations to quantify the spatiotemporal dynamics of the inflammatory cascade and develop targeted therapies.  This work is part of a broad interest in the dynamics of complex biological systems.  Specifically, we study the kinetics of immunity and inflammation, and we develop chemically targeted methods to control these processes in the context of vaccination, autoimmunity, and chronic inflammatory disease.

Morkowchuk

Lisa Morkowchuk is an instructor for Introductory College Chemistry lecture (1410/1610) and laboratories (1411/1611). She received a B.S. in Chemistry from Moravian College in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. Much of her undergraduate education was presented in a guided-inquiry format, and she quickly realized the value of peer interaction in education and the depth of understanding that comes from inquiry-based learning.

Machan

The Machan group is interested in energy-relevant catalysis, particularly at the interface of molecular electrochemistry and materials. The development of efficient and selective transformations to produce commodity chemical precursors and fuels using CO2, O2, H2, and H2O as reagents remains an ongoing challenge for the storage of electrical energy within chemical bonds. Our approach is inspired by the numerous metalloproteins capable of catalyzing kinetically challenging reactions with significant energy barriers in an efficient manner under ambient conditions.

Lazo

The pharmacological mechanism of action of small molecules and on the fundamental biological role of protein tyrosine phosphatases in disease. 


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